21 2 / 2014

barakatgallerybeverlyhills:

Ayutthaya Bronze Head of the Buddha Origin: ThailandCirca: 1350 AD to 1564 AD

barakatgallerybeverlyhills:

Ayutthaya Bronze Head of the Buddha
Origin: Thailand
Circa: 1350 AD to 1564 AD

(Source: barakatgallery, via dharmasimulation)

13 2 / 2014

madewithpaper:

Blue Man
Made With Paper by seanstockmann

madewithpaper:

Blue Man

Made With Paper by seanstockmann

13 2 / 2014

y0y0art:


Ando Utagawa Hiroshige - New Year’s Eve Fox Fires at the Changing Tree, Oji. 1856-1859 (Fox Folk 2)It was believed that on New Year’s Eve all the foxes of the surrounding provinces would gather at a particular tree near Oji Inari Shrine, the headquarters of the regional cult of the god Inari. There the foxes would change their dress for a visit to the shrine, where they would be given orders for the coming year. On the way, the animals would emit distinctive flames by which local farmers were able to predict the crops of the coming year.
(source: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=566397170101473&set=a.444305985643926.1073741852.303031413104718&type=1&relevant_count=1)

y0y0art:

Ando Utagawa Hiroshige - New Year’s Eve Fox Fires at the Changing Tree, Oji. 1856-1859 (Fox Folk 2)

It was believed that on New Year’s Eve all the foxes of the surrounding provinces would gather at a particular tree near Oji Inari Shrine, the headquarters of the regional cult of the god Inari. There the foxes would change their dress for a visit to the shrine, where they would be given orders for the coming year. On the way, the animals would emit distinctive flames by which local farmers were able to predict the crops of the coming year.

(source: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=566397170101473&set=a.444305985643926.1073741852.303031413104718&type=1&relevant_count=1)

(via dharmasimulation)

11 1 / 2014

dharmasimulation:

magpiemouse:

ITO Sozan
"Crows Flying in Snow"early 1920s

A traditional Japanese ink painting

dharmasimulation:

magpiemouse:

ITO Sozan

"Crows Flying in Snow"
early 1920s

A traditional Japanese ink painting

07 1 / 2014

24 12 / 2013

Fascinating. I “get” Buddhism in the West, Judaism in the North East, and Islam in the Deep South. Kind of a mix of immigrant ethnicities and subsequent cultural developments since the 1960s. Maybe also geographical proximity. Might Islam in the upper midwest be the result of the Great Migration? Hm. What surprised me the most is Arizona. What’s going on over there?

Fascinating. I “get” Buddhism in the West, Judaism in the North East, and Islam in the Deep South. Kind of a mix of immigrant ethnicities and subsequent cultural developments since the 1960s. Maybe also geographical proximity. Might Islam in the upper midwest be the result of the Great Migration? Hm. What surprised me the most is Arizona. What’s going on over there?

20 12 / 2013

I find it intriguing that Buddhism could be considered threatening by anyone. In one version of the Ratzinger story, the Cardinal seems to be a raving reactionary. In another, though he makes plain his convictions about a transcendent truth, he seems speculative and thoughtful. Huh.

In 1997 Ratzinger called Buddhism an “autoerotic spirituality” that offers “transcendence without imposing concrete religious obligations.” Hinduism, he said, offers “false hope,” in that it guarantees “purification” based on a “morally cruel” concept of reincarnation resembling “a continuous circle of hell.” At the time, Cardinal Ratzinger predicted that Buddhism would replace Marxism as the Catholic church’s main enemy.

Or:

A Christian cannot give up his knowledge of revealed truth, that Jesus Christ is the only son of God. If they are attracted to Buddhism, this is because it offers a possibility of happiness by touching the infinite, without having concrete religious obligations. It is, to some extent, a spiritual self-absorption. Somebody predicted in 1950, that the challenge to the Church in the 20th century would not be Marxism, but Buddhism.

I think his description of the initial attraction of Buddhism is a fair one without it having to be a fair description of Buddhism itself.

The first is from a Rabbi deeply concerned about Ratzinger’s social conservatism, while the second is from an American Buddhist and mental health professional.

Huh.

15 12 / 2013

dharmasimulation:

PHOTOGRAPH: An earthy tea set

dharmasimulation:

PHOTOGRAPH: An earthy tea set

(Source: maya47000)

03 12 / 2013

beyoung1990:

Find Your Own Aura

beyoung1990:

Find Your Own Aura

29 11 / 2013

omsutrabuddha:


PAINTING: Kuan Yin Buddha portrait

omsutrabuddha:

PAINTING: Kuan Yin Buddha portrait

(via dharmasimulation)

28 11 / 2013

"

I’m reluctant to make judgments about what other teachers are doing, but I will merely point to one important adaptation that has taken place in the contemporary teaching of vipassana meditation that can easily pass unnoticed. I get the impression that the purpose for which mindfulness meditation is being taught in the West has undergone a sea change from its traditional function, perhaps because many Western teachers are teaching outside the framework of classical Buddhist doctrine. Mindfulness meditation, it seems, is now taught mainly as a means to heighten our experience of the present moment. The aim of the practice is to enable us to accept everything that happens to us without discrimination. Through heightened mindfulness of the present moment, we learn to accept everything as intrinsically good, to see everything as instructive, to experience everything as inherently rewarding. We can thus simply abide in the present, heartily accepting whatever comes, open to the ever-fresh, ever-unpredictable flow of events.

Now at a certain level, such a style of teaching does impart valuable lessons to us. It is certainly much better to accept whatever comes than to live eagerly pursuing pleasure and anxiously fleeing pain. It is much wiser to see the positive lessons inherent in pain, loss and transience than to bemoan our miserable fate. However, to present this as the main point of the Buddha’s teaching would be, in my view, a misinterpretation of the Dhamma. The Buddha’s teaching, as given in the suttas, has quite a different logic behind it. The teaching isn’t designed to culminate in acceptance of the world, but to lead out beyond the confines of conditioned experience to that which transcends the world, to the ageless and deathless, which is also the cessation of suffering. Simply maintaining awareness of the present in order to arrive at a detached acceptance of the present could easily lead through the back door to a reconciliation with samsara, to a reaffirmation of samsara, not to release from samsara.

In the classical teaching, through mindful attention to the present, we zoom in on the arising and passing away of phenomena in order to gain insight into their impermanence. But we don’t affirm the impermanence of things; it is not in this way that we reach the end of suffering. The insight into impermanence, anicca, becomes, rather, the gateway to the insights into dukkha, the flawed nature of all conditioned things, and anatta, the selfless nature of all phenomena. And insight into these three characteristics brings disenchantment with all conditioned things. From disenchantment comes dispassion, and from dispassion liberation, the realization of nibbana here and now.

"

28 11 / 2013

Putting together a niche podcast. Write the show notes in Emacs, generate the site via a customer Clojure app, and so on.

Putting together a niche podcast. Write the show notes in Emacs, generate the site via a customer Clojure app, and so on.

27 11 / 2013

I’ve taken to porting an app from a hacked version of pub/sub to core.async. Each “part” of the UI is in a separate namespace and maintains its own event loop.

Seemed like a good idea at the time.

I like the idea of small, independent components working together via data-oriented messages, but there’s a point at which you realize that a UI is a UI is a single concern.

Anyway, first thing’s first.

I’ve taken to porting an app from a hacked version of pub/sub to core.async. Each “part” of the UI is in a separate namespace and maintains its own event loop.

Seemed like a good idea at the time.

I like the idea of small, independent components working together via data-oriented messages, but there’s a point at which you realize that a UI is a UI is a single concern.

Anyway, first thing’s first.

22 11 / 2013

dharmasimulation:

ILLUSTRATION: An infographic of the Buddha labeled with many points of interest

dharmasimulation:

ILLUSTRATION: An infographic of the Buddha labeled with many points of interest

(Source: paradoxeleven)

20 11 / 2013

Hey! Editing a podcast due on 11/15. But that’s how I roll. Always late. Always.

Hey! Editing a podcast due on 11/15. But that’s how I roll. Always late. Always.